About your Search

20140226
20140306
SHOW
News 27
Hannity 10
Cavuto 9
( more )
STATION
SFGTV 108
ALJAZAM 55
MSNBCW 54
CSPAN2 53
CSPAN 46
CNNW 31
KPIX (CBS) 29
CNBC 28
FBC 27
KCSM (PBS) 23
KQED (PBS) 16
KGO (ABC) 12
LINKTV 12
KNTV (NBC) 7
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 644
Korean 3
French 2
Search Results 250 to 299 of about 649 (some duplicates have been removed)
or the environment. that is an important point to be made. that is the argument being used against keystone. host: he also asked you about unemployment insurance. guest: i am open to that. we offered a bill that we would be really -- we would be willing to support. we put forward alternatives that i have supported and republicans would support. we have to make sure that as we passed legislation we are addressing the deficit and the debt. a 17.2 trillion dollar debt. we have to address that for future generations. to a caller from alaska, anchorage, alaska. patrick, republican line. you are on was senator hoven. caller: good morning. thank you for the washington journal. it is a very valuable resource for us. senator hoven, i have two questions. because of the previous caller, i wanted to clarify one point regarding private and public oil out of alaska. governor hickle saw to it that we became an owner states. much closer to that oil being private oil than it is public. the oil companies appear are telling us that the reason there is only 500,000 barrels a day going down the pipe is because structure
and greenpeace cofounder patrick moore. he made these comments before the senate environment and public works committee. he left greenpeace because he says that group became more interested in politics than the environment. what an announcement from him. >>> men who wait too long to become fathers could put their children at greater risk of developing mental health problems. that's according to a new study that followed more than 2.5 million men for 25 years. researchers found a child born to a 45-year-old father compared to a 24-year-old dad was three times more likely to have autism, 13 times more likely to have adhd, 25 times more likely to be bipolar and twice as likely to have schizophrenia. this is video you have to see to believe. two guys in those wing suits flying past christ the redeemer statue in britain. look at this. the two daredevils making that jump from about 6,500 feet. they landed safely. and what was the first thing they did? what do you think? what do you think? >> they prayed. >> drank a beer. look at that. >> they earned it. >> how close they get. nerve wracking. see yo
room in a portfolio for equities in an environment of low rates, even if they're going higher, they're going higher in a very slow fashion, if you want. growth is subdued but is still supportive. so that's overall an environment where you want to be in stocks. >> you know, you're the big picture type of investor, and the big picture for the u.s. market for the last four years has been all of the easy money policy from the federal reserve and plenty of people feel like that's why we are sitting at all-time highs right now. so why wouldn't it reverse itself as the fed begins to pull back on the easy money and even if it starts to raise interest rates sooner rather than later, why isn't this a time when the market starts to retreat, where are we still going higher now? >> well, i think although, you know, we're expecting a normalization of rates at some point in the future, we're not talking about something very quick or very drastic. and at the same time the world is healing from its traumatic experience, if you want, from the crisis. so all of this is supportive. now, actually, clear
environment, and i would hope that everyone understand that it is all about order. and if we don't have order, we cannot provide programs. we're constantly looking down institutions. since the hearing in 2012, we have restricted housing population reduction by 25 perce percent. we have gone from 13.5 percent to 6.5 percent. so reductions are occurring. we are only interested in placing people in restrictive housing when there is justification. we have 20,000 gang members in our system. they are watching this hearing. they are watching our testimony very, very closely for the reason being if they see we will lower standards and not hold the individuals accountable, it puts the staff and inmates at risk. and this is why i mentioned in my oral statement, we are looking at staff being injured and harmed but our staff is putting their lives on the line to protect the american public. and we have inmates within the population who are being harmed by these individuals who have no respect, i mean no respect for other's when it comes to their safety. we cannot afford, at any time, to say that for thos
for a solitary confinement has left some sense reductions environment to of violence, restraint shares, inmates can themselves up which used to happen every week. almost totally eliminated as a result of these changes. reducing the duration. those that used to go there for drugs, they may still go, but if they test claim of bacon graduate out of solitary confinement and a summit is being kept for more than 72 hours a decision is reviewed by the commissioner. i also want to know that one of the keys in texas to reduce in solitary confinement has been the gain enunciation program. announcing their gang. i also want to point out that using sanctions and incentives behind bars is a way to provide for incentives that the inmates to be a better which therefore reduces the need for solitary confinement. one of the models of the parallel universe model. the longer curfew. does that ms. b gave have been denied privileges such as making donegals and access to the mail and other things. this creates a positive incentive. we notice things like the white hope program. there is a 24 hours timeout. we have to
promise to keep it that way. driven to preserve the environment, csx moves a ton of freight nearly 450 miles on one gallon of fuel. what a day. can't wait til tomorrow. ♪ but if you cholose your eyes does it always feel like nothing's aged at all ♪ ♪ and if you close your eyes does it almost feel like ♪ >>> time now for cramer and "stop trading" jim. >> the idea that craft beer may have peaked and going back to buds, people are bud izzing abo that. boston beer numbers is not what we expected, this sam. and anheuser-busch, inbev, grade number turnaround in brazil and mexico, huge places that drink beer. is it a trend that can continue? if boston beer wants to spend less money they can show better gross margins. but this deal worked out. and worked out for constellation. the beer market's good. i don't want to make too much of the idea that craft beer has peaked but people will reach that conclusion. >> spirits taking a lot of share overall. >> diagio reported a quarter that was not so hot and the stock came back. if people want to take a real close look at boston beer they're no
to incentives and health systems incentive changes, to less expensive environments that include clinics and home care. we're in the midst of a big transition overall. >> what is it that your company does exactly when you go in and try and streamline things? >> we're a performance improvement company that focuses on cost, in other words, how you procure all products. we have a $5 billion procurement business that helps hospitals buy what they buy, more importantly, how they use the products. there's a best practice out there but it's not used across the country. we take the process to what we know as best practices. >> you're trying to get people paid quicker, right? i mean, there's a million places to attack. are there too many -- what are your two or three primary ways of doing it? you can get bogged down being all things to all people. >> hospitals aline are over a trillion dollars vertically integrated in 5,000 locations, all very complex and all very different. we focus on cost reduction, clinical integration and payment and price integration so that what's being paid for the services render
, look, in a hyper partisan environment where he has to run for re-election, an issue like this can be polarized. any issue around race, as you know, wolf, sends people to their full rise corners. the last thing the president wants to do when he's running for re-election is to have a country more polarized. i think the beauty of this time now is you can have more risky conversations that are important for moving this country forward right now in his second term. so i'm thankful that he did. >> i want to play another excerpt from the president's powerful speech. cornell and don, both of you listen to this. >> no excuses. government and philanthropy, faith-based communities, we've got to help you knock down some of the barriers that you experience. that's what we're here for. but you've got responsibilities, too. and i know you can meet the challenge. many of you already are, if you make the effort. it may be hard, but you will have to reject the cynicism that the circumstances of your birth or societies injustices necessarily defines you and your future. it will take courage but you'
agree that an environment of low rates, low interest rates, especially when it p prevails for a long time, and we have had a long period of low interest rates can give rise to behavior that poses threats to financial stability. and therefore we need to be looking at that very carefully. and we are doing so in a very thorough way, i believe. there are a number of things that we are monitoring. measures of asset prices and whether or not they appear to be diverging from historical norms. namely it's hard but trying to spot any asset price bubbles that might be emerging. we're looking at leverage, which build up in leverage can be very dangerous to the financial system and pose stability risks. we're looking at trends in leverage. we're looking at credit growth to see whether or not that has potentially worrisome trends. in addition to that we're looking the particularly through the stress tests at financial institutions and a low interest rate environment. we have to worry about whether or not they're appropriately dealing with interest rate risk ls. we have been looking at that and, i
agitating these days. stay with us because i want to ,alk about the deal environment this onslaught of investor activism we are seeing. sweeneynging in paul and merger arbitrage strategist. let's start with joseph a bank in this saga that is going on in the men's retail sector. it is interesting they seem to be going back-and-forth. ultimately, who wins? >> i've been covering this from the beginning. i am more than aware of what is going on. the biggest issue here is the timing. when you look at the release, it said we need to do this quickly. if you're going to give us your best offer, give it to us right now because if you're not, we will close this eddie bauer d eal. that is what is happening now and they need the due diligence to increase the price to $65 and maybe more. it is not $65 in cash. it could be stock. men's wearhouse has the door open to close this transaction. activist fieldhe with ebay and paypal. is rattling the cages on almost a daily basis. he was on with me a couple of against pushing heavily the paypal spinoff. one thing he is trying to get investors to pay att
)-right-paren so they are savvy in the global media environment. >> if they become more influential in the post 14 afghanistan or if they are candidates that are sympathetic and win a seat or two if they are going to be a part of the game or if they are going to be fighting, which i guess they are in some places. if they might somehow get engaged in governing, could they possibly tolerate other voices? can be mature to the level they allow other people to speak as well as them in a more serious afghanistan than the one they ran previously. >> the short answer of that is probably not. there's a lot of wishful thinking that has gone on about the telegram. you could imagine that a woman's are in the political process but they are a relatively small part of that equation. i think the single biggest wild card is what the pakistanis do a serious military operation in north was there a -- wasserstein and the people that have been told has reached the point where the sharif government has said we are serious and that could change for the telegram if they no longer have a safe haven or they
that an environment of low rates, low interest rates, especially when it p prevails for a long time, and we have had a long period of low interest rates can give rise to behavior that poses threats to financial stability. and therefore we need to be looking at that very carefully. and we are doing so in a very thorough way, i believe. there are a number of things that we are monitoring. measures of asset prices and whether or not they appear to be diverging from historical norms. namely it's hard but trying to spot any asset price bubbles that might be emerging. we're looking at leverage, which build up in leverage can be very dangerous to the financial system and pose stability risks. we're looking at trends in leverage. we're looking at credit growth to see whether or not that has potentially worrisome trends. in addition to that we're looking the particularly through the stress tests at financial institutions and a low interest rate environment. we have to worry about whether or not they're appropriately dealing with interest rate risk ls. we have been looking at that and, in fact, our current st
? >> well, it's a new operational environment for him. where we want him to work is the new york city subway system. we do transit canine. because it's a stressful environment overseas in afghanistan, he -- it's very hard for a dog to work in our subway system. >> tell the people what he's going to be doing. by the way, what experience did he learn over there that he can translate into saving lives here in new york? >> cesar is an explosive detection dog. he's trained on all the odors we train on here in new york. he does have 12 legitimate finds in afghanistan. so he's proven. now what we're going to do is transition him into a police dog. he's going to be patrolling the new york city subway system. >> so you guys are going to go through a 12-week session together? >> yes. >> new training. >> what needs to be done? >> i'm not sure. we haven't started the training yet. we're starting as of this week. i'm new to the transit system. i came from a precinct. >> so you're both starting together. he's going to start with a new name, correct? >> no, we're going to keep the name. >> oh, that's great
environment today, even a small business has to spend $20,000 to $30,000 just complying with the 2800 regulations we layered on them federally let alone the state and local. you know, erin, i invest in small businesses every week. what's what i do. you should have these people talk to you. or even better still, let the president talk to somebody running a 17-person business in massachusetts or 30 employees in california. and hear what they say. they would not agree with him. and i think that is the core and the essence of america that we're not listening to. we need to listen to these people. they should tell us what to do. what they want right now is less government. >> thank you very much. i remember, by the way, the president saying he was going to go back and cut a whole lot of regulations. there was a big push for that. when you say 2800 on average, i'm going to assume you know your stats on that. that's horrific. that's probably something you could agree with the president on, too. still to come, a controversial bill some say is anti-gay in front of arizona's governor tonight. w
this plan by hager does not accurately reflect the security environment. roy blunt, it has the potential to harm america's readiness. we're not likely to see the knock-down, drag-out fight. remember the sequester was supposed to be the stick that would force republicans and some democrats to negotiate a grand bargain. but as we saw, many republicans looked over the edge of the cliff and said, you know what, sequester not so bad. in fact, some conservatives support the sequester, for imposing cuts that congress wouldn't have had the stomach to put in place otherwise, and for republicans, some conservatives who are putting fiscal responsibility near the top of their priority list, this may be a question of picking your poison. now, according to south carolina governor nikki haley, president obama delivered that message pretty bluntly when he spoke to republican governors at the chamber of commerce -- she was at the chamber of commerce, but this is what he said, according to her, when they met at the white house. >> the tone completely changed when we started talking about the national guar
the environment and clean water standards is not antigrowth. in fact, it's projobs. when i recently toured the family-run trucking company in my district, they were not against truck safety standards. they do the right thing by their workers and they abide by safe driving rules. and they want regulations to ensure that others do the same. what they are against are new truck safety standards that hinder growth without actually making trucking any safer. smarter regulations should protect good businesses from bad actors. i'll give you another example. denny hudson, he runs sea coast bank, a small community bank in florida. like many small financial institutions, they weathered the financial crisis because they were not involved in the risky financial behavior. they expected mortgages to be repaid on time and they wanted the small businesses they supported to succeed. after the financial crisis of 2008, nearly took down the global economy, most people agreed that government regulators needed to better protect our financial system. but if new regulations keep community banks like sea coast fro
experts say that's possible. but what if something in the environment is the culprit. state health officials have found nothing so far. you would think they would be working around the clock trying to find an answer talking to every single mom who's lost a baby. they're not and outrage is growing. here's senior correspondent elizabeth cohen. >> reporter: in the rural and fertile yakima valley, an alarming number of babies born with birth defects. anencephaly, babies born with much of their brain and skull missing. >> i was stunned. three in a couple month period of time. that's unheard of. they are such tragic, terrible outcomes. >> reporter: barron's shocking discovery prompted an investigation by the state health department, which showed that in three counties in a three-year period there were 23 cases of anencephaly, a rate four times the national average. what could be causing such a high rate here? is it just a coincidence or something more serious? this epidemiologist at the washington state health department conducted the investigation. >> did you find an answer? >> we have
to keep it that way. driven to preserve the environment, csx moves a ton of freight nearly 450 miles on one gallon of fuel. what a day. can't wait til tomorrow. liz: shares of best buy on the move to be profit expectations lee janzen analyst at janney montgomery scott, you were on a conference, what did you hear that surprise you? >> 18 months ago this country everyone thought was going out of business, actually argued today. and hybrid models are out there that the investments they make, the ones they're working on, making tough to compete with online. liz: will they have o downstairs' their retail store even more? >> they have markets where they have more density of stores than they need and over time it is inevitable that will happen. there taking hours out of the store because 12% of their business is now online. some productivity you don't need as much investment in energy and a. liz: the chart looks negative, the stock fell off a cliff. you sound positive. is there an opportunity? >> it is an opportunity. proof of concept will come in queue 4. even though they had lower number
's dedicated to minimizing its impact on the environment while teaching students about sustainability. >> the more we can create a model of, you know, this kind of living, you know, that ethic seeps into our culture at the school. >> reporter: they were installing programmable thermostats and replacing all the lights with cfls. in 2008 they installed a solar panel system of more than 2300 panels that offsets about 85% of the electrical bill. in the cafeteria, bins are labeled and every day the waste is taken for composting. >> we come down and we pour it in the bins and then we add water and manure and then some straw on top and we wait. >> we have kind of our sink dishwashing station. >> reporter: but the hub of the school sustainability program is its garden, an acre of land with garden beds, lemon trees an outdoor kitchen and chickens. >> it's nice to have all these things because we can really learn about how to keep the environment safe. >> reporter: by planting the food, they're learning about healthy eating. >> you planted the plant in the winter and then it grows in the spring
is he grew up in a more forgiving environment. and in hawaii, if you got in trouble, there weren't any real serious consequences, but on the streets of chicago, the consequences could be fatal. and he -- i was going to say, he feels this enormous responsibility to make sure that all of our children grow up and have the ability for that fair shot and opportunity to reach their dreams and so many children are being left behind right now. >> yeah, let's talk about it. he wants to bring a spotlight to this. >> yes, he does. >> how will this work? you talk about reaching out to corporations. what does that mean? explain the mechanics of the initiative. >> sure, let's go through that. already, we have ten foundations who are committed to putting up resources, in addition to the ones they've already put up, $150 million has already been spent, and they're prepared to invest an additional $200 million. and then we have a range of corporate leaders very engaged and interested in this issue. and what we'd like to do is let's look at the programs that work, like the "becoming a man" program in ch
world and they're going to continue to do so. >> are we still in a low interest rate environment despite the fact the fed is tapering? is that your assessment? >> i am quite sure we'll will be in a low interest rate environment. confidence,more , westing more into equities brought in richard buxton and his team and he has ready well -- his ability and pounds his ability and pounds over the last six months. we're seeing people invest more. end of the day, you do not get much return if you've got cash or fixed interest. looks what can you do to counter that -- >> what can you do to counter that when yields remain low? what are you doing to counter that. >> we look at our customers and look at their risk tolerances and we decide -- designed to portfolios to meet those risks. if you're willing to take a bit more risks, they're our alternative products. we believe advice is really important for people. -- we are buying the largest network of restricted an independent financial advisers because we think our proposition is good for solutions. we believe we can expand our offering in the u.k.. >
these the environment you want, uaw certain slit people for you to -- are the people to choose. they can't help with the wages. you have got a facility that's the most advanced, environmentally sound facility in the world right here in chattanooga, tennessee. so, what's this about? it's about one thing. it's about money and it's about power. >> now, in the arena of public opinion, do you think most common sense folks would say, that's involvement? that's real involvement in an election? overall, corker flat-out lied about the united auto workers union. >> we support the works council notion that they are trying to implement. we just had concerns about the uaw. we know of their track record. we know what's happened in communities were they've been located. we know they have been a job-destroying entity through the years. >> no, no, no, no. corker is lying when he makes comments like that about the uaw. uaw has saved thousands of johns all over the country and they have the numbers to back it up. let me be clear, folks. corker's intimidation of plant workers was absolutely unprecedented. never in
the government's case is weak because the cops are doing their job in a tough environment. >> part of the job is that you can't sometimes put on a public relations persona when you're dealing with drug dealers and pimps and the scumbags that they have to deal with in this kind of an assignment. so, yes, these guys are -- are real officers dealing in very dangerous and volatile environments and they have to have a tough exterior. >> reporter: a second indictment accuses officer edmond robles, sergeant ian furminger and another officer not in court today of stealing marijuana from evidence and telling informants to sell it and split the proceeds with them. some drug deals were caught on tape. an attorney for three of the cops' alleged victims claims this happens a lot. >> we have seen this and the practice that happens a lot amongst people who work undercover as drug officers they themselves become drug users. >> reporter: why does it happen? is it the culture or they get too close and they don't get involved? >> you run up on a lot of money and no one is there to watch you. >> reporter: but t
in a different world. we wanted to create an environment that the guests don't want to move. it's been a long haul. really, how many awards show, how much rain, how much traffic? i really do want to create meaningful experiences. i really want to create an environment where those can gather to celebrate. >> reporter: there is plenty to see here and eat here thanks to wolfgang puck and his staff. i'm calling this party beauty and the feast.v, >> it's all of wolfgang's favorites and then some. they're sitting down and having like one dinner, eight ounces or 12 ounces of one thing, they'll have 40 different items. >> reporter: i tasted the mac and cheese with black truffle. now i know why truffles are so expensiv expensive. i took my oscar to go and on the subject of oscars -- >> here is the engraving station. this is exactly where the winners will be with one guest with a glass of champagne and having their oscar engraved. >> reporter: this ball takes place in a 28,000 square foot room, surrounded with some remarkable vertical garden. >> it has to be the next. it has to be the new idea, and the
come in here and you're really in a different world. we wanted to create an environment that the guests don't want to move. it's been a long haul. really, how many awards show, how much rain, how much traffic? i really do want to create meaningful experiences. i really want to create an environment where those can gather to celebrate. >> reporter: there is plenty to see here and eat here thanks to wolfgang puck and his staff. i'm calling this party beauty and the feast. >> it's all of wolfgang's favorites and then some. they're sitting down and having like one dinner, eight ounces or 12 ounces of one thing, they'll have 40 different items. >> reporter: i tasted the mac and cheese with black truffle. i took my oscar to go and on the subject of oscars -- >> here is the engraving station. this is exactly where the winners will be with one guest with a glass of champagne and having their oscar engraved. >> reporter: this ball takes place in a 28,000 square foot room, surrounded with some remarkable vertical garden. >> it has to be the next. it has to be the new idea, and the installation lo
on the energy front. we have to realize a pristine environment can come at a very high, if not unacceptable cost. >> yeah. brian, in terms of safe guarding your investments as we watch this unfold, what do you do? what's your plan? >> i would have no problem telling people to actually sell into the weakness. why is that? because this headline risk can morph into fundamental risk. melissa: really? you want to sell into the weakness. >> yes because i'm not, i don't have that signal yet that the sell something over if i wake up tomorrow, i see all the negative pictures, many people other than starbucks. costs $250,000 to open a starbucks in russia. that is risk to their results nobody is thinking about. melissa: judy what is your prediction what putin will do? those forecast that he will get much worse as he spreads his power out? >> i think it depends on the calculation he makes about the financial, military reputational price he would have to pay if he proceeds further. he is a very calculating guy. he doesn't take reckless risks. he takes risks. this one if he is convinced there will be a too hi
. this keeps -- >> this is holding the environment hostage. >> and we have seen this before where people sit in trees and things like that. look, this keystone pipeline is such a no-brainer, everybody with the exception of the president and these people -- >> unions want it. >> for the jobs created. president obama0s own state department issued a report, gaving it the okay. this has been under study for six years and every single tied study says the environmental impact will be -- transporting the oil and national gas via train, truck, other ways, will actually -- >> you don't want to -- they're not tying themselves to the white house fence, they're loyal and speak for many who are environmental conscious and thigh think this pipeline is nuts. so the president has been delay, delay, delay, keep the union guys happen they might open it up and get the jobs going, and the environmentalists. but you can only wait this out so lodge it's been five years. >> it's ridiculous at this point. every study has come back saying the environmental impact will be minimal. and transcanada will not wait foreve
in this environment. bitt made me a uncomfortable, to say the least. giantnkfully, the galapagos tortoise do not get excited about meal time. they can live months without food. because hee new 18 is going to live to 200. to cornices and lemurs, it shelters rare birds. >> doing very well. right here. >> i see him right there. it was once native to the area of the caribbean and when he moved here, there was not a single one left. >> because they are beautiful, they may have been killed for the feathers. >> branson has a big plan for them. >> once we have enough, we will move them on and hopefully, they will have scarlet ibis there. >> i would never leave. >> yeah. yeah. yeah. >> trish regan, bloomberg. >> whether animal or human. thethose listening on radio, the first word is up next. or our viewers, the pulse is back. we'll talk to the chief executive officer. our top story is that the ukraine is in crisis and we talked to the ukraine ambassador to the k -- the u.k. he seestalk about how this evolving. you can follow us on twitter. i know that there has been good stuff on cars and car pictures. we wi
at morgan stanley is still bullish, saying look, in this type of environment it's all about growth, even though you do have some big valuations in certain sectors within tech. that's where the growth is and that's where you see investors going and particularly on a day like today, they are flocking towards a tech-heavy nasdaq index. >> understandably so. thanks, sheila. appreciate it very much. >>> the dow is having its best day of the year. we are up almost 218 points on the trading session. now bob pisani is here. it's lifting almost all boats today. >> that's right. earlier today it was ten to one advancing to declining stocks. relief rally's a good way to describe this given what happened yesterday and the strength of the rally. midcap, historic high. small cap, russell 2000 at an historic high. the volatility in the vix, remember yesterday it went from 14 to 16? it went back down to 14 today, indication that tensions are easing. we don't know why. it was always unclear what the military action would be. it seems very clear we don't know what's going to happen but tanks are not going
being the low interest-rate environment. qwest also, companies are doing well. our corporate clients are doing nicely. >> are they willing to spend? you are an advertising guy. spends expected to grow by three or four percent. i think the uncertainty about the fiscal policy is --sing corporations >> what would give you more confidence that you know exactly what to expect about taxation policy and health care reform, etc.. there is no indication about what the final outcome would be. 70% of the business are outside of america. they are in china and russia and brazil. those markets are growing. each one differently, but china, i read yesterday, seven or eight percent growth in the economy. not nine or 10% of where it was. i do not see anything on the horizon. there is nothing on the horizon that gives you consternation and says the fundamentals of the --nomy >> the fed has been it's a much money. qwest we produced a surplus. you noticed the fiscal reform has been so uncertain. as a result, they cut expenses. the canadian mindset is you have to have a bounce budget. qwest we have john k
to their moneys stashed in british banks, that would become a very different russian environment. now they're walking in the streets happy and screaming. you know, ukraine is russia, or crimea is russia. i would like to see russia completely closed. it is not the cold war, but if the borders are closed for other reasons, how popular will putin become with grandiose strategies. >> certainly once you start messing with people's money, they take it very personally. lawrence, a question i had about this is, you know, there are other actors on the world stage who are like in syria, like karzai, who's been particularly difficult. how does the way that president obama handles this situation impact, you know -- iran is another one. what are these world leaders looking for? >> well, i think all of these are interrelated. while we want to penalize putin for doing this, you need his help both in syria and eastern. without the russians putting the sanctions on iran, we would not be at the negotiating table. i think you have to keep these things in mind. your other guests would know this. the soviets c
it or not we want to knit. it comes to power and does so even for the overall environment thereby leading a protest note to result in a democratically elected government being pushed aside so the dinner as long as saying the united states has the government wants. how do you think that government may turn out looking at the current crop of opposition leaders who are now and for all intensive purposes in power there do you think that that could end up being a final government well it's really difficult since when does the situations are so turbulent an ounce of course that the united states is not interested in having a fascist government in place so all we do have these white nationalists take extreme elements alone. some of those in the new korean government united states. it is the one thousand people of color what is holy war is that they will be good to be displaced and that will get more moderate figures that can be more or less controlled. now we've heard promises of financial aid coming from europe do you think europe and also the us would be able to contribute the amount of money
environment that is going to affect brazil and chile. as a geopolitical matter, the united states and it's relationships with south america are at risk. the oil problem is a big one. if venezuela should really go essentially belly up, that is going to--that could raise oil prices for a while to $5 to $10 a barrel. >> first of all, brazil one of the countries we've talked about for several years now as being on an economic growth terror, that's not the case. it's growth has slowed and it will grow a little less or about the same as the united states in 2014. it will start to have an impact on the world. there is a real domino affect if latin america becomes a problem. what is the effect to the rest of us? >> it's probably pretty contained. i think argentina, the reason why we're concerned about brazil is we think argentina is really going to go down. in its economy, and in its politics. and argentina buys a lot from brazil and chile, so both of those countries are going to suffer in their economy. brazil has other problems. you put it together, and you got a chunk of latin america in trou
this would cause harm to the state's reputation and into the business environment. >> reporter: it's already threatened ben bethel's clarendon hotel, despite his sign saying we serve everyone. he said gay customers inquiring about refunds and cancellations. >> that would result in about -- i'd say about 12,000 now, to $14,000 in lost revenue to the hotel. and that itself results in almost $2,000 in local and state sales tax revenues lost. >> reporter: but with the tide turning, even republicans who supported and voted for the bill, like state senator steve pierce -- you didn't think it was targeting the lgbt community? >> not at all, no. >> reporter: they're now urging brewer to veto it. >> we made a mistake, and now we have to fix it. >> reporter: if the governor doesn't sign or veto the bill by the end of the week it becomes law automatically. still, this morning an aide to the governor said this bill was never part of her agenda, another hint that a veto is likely. brian? >> mike taibbi starting us off from phoenix tonight. mike, thanks. >>> now to a new fight that's erupted in public tod
and planning and the sf mta so it's absolutely a collaborative environment to look at what is happening on our streets and what can we do to move forward in terms of plent so i think we have made strides? this effort. >> who is in charge? >> the mta is in charge for the most part. we are tasked with the individual projects and collaboration with them. some require collaboration but for the most part we will do the planning work and the implementation and finding the funding securing the funding through our budget or of the grants to actually make the improvements. >> i appreciate that and when i asked this question several years ago none of the departments stepped up and said we're responsible for this and unless there is a department that has the responsibility for being in charge of driving this it's hard for us as policy makers to find out who is accountable to us to get this done so i appreciate your answer. >> absolutely. >> thank you. >> thanks. supervisor tang. okay. i just have -- can you tell me where the mta is on approving the -- or hearing the vision zero plan at their commiss
and make an impact on the environment and take cars off the street and promotes -- reduce the carbon footprint of our transportation in san francisco. since 2012 we -- the city has partnered with community based organizations on a series bike builds and they provide low income youths with refurbished bikes. this program has distributed over 400 bicycles to san francisco youth. the number of bikes on streets increased but the outer neighborhoods and excelsior and bay view and parts of the mission are behind the city core and we want to expand the opportunities to these areas that don't have the greatest access f we're going to reach our goal of 20% bike trips by 2020 that president chiu supported and all of us promoted we need to increase access to bikes especially low income neighborhoods in the outer neighborhoods and this is a great program and partnership -- we am hear about it in a second with the video from the police department that support this legislation make sure that unclaimed bikes, bikes that are sitting in a warehouse for a number of months and years can find a home a
greenest recycling company in the country. >> i do believe in the green environment tally sound policies. >> reporter: brian mcvay was once proud of his job. he was a supervisor at recology. two buy back centers have helped san francisco reach an 80% recycling rate. the highest in the nation. but at this buy back center on tunnel road, brian says there were problems. so he installed surveillance cameras to keep an eye on things. >> there is the attendant. she going to weigh the material. >> reporter: he estimates that was about two pounds of plastic and three pounds of aluminum but the report from that transaction shows something different. 68 pounds of plastic and 47 pounds of aluminum. then, off the customer goes to get his cash to later split with his buddy, the employee. >> and this is an example of what went on all day. >> reporter: in 2007, company records show 6.3 million pounds of bottles and cans taken in for recycling. but only 1.4 million pounds leaving for processing. armed with the evidence, brian took his findings to management but he was told to back off. even threatened.
work environments you can imagine. one of them told me about this thing called the banker nine to five. it's where you work from 9:00 a.m. until 5:00 a.m. the next day so this is pretty common and it's a really intense culture. a lot of people get burned out very quickly. > > what happens next to these young people after working those so-called banker hours? > > well some of them stay in finance and decide to make a career of it but of the 8 young people that i followed, about half of them decided that they didn't want to be on wall street. it wasn't what they expected. they wanted the parties and the lamborghinis, and in some cases the sort of wolf of wall street culture, but what they got was something much more dull and much more harder to cope with. > > is it worth it, though, for some in the end? you work and you grind it out, but like a lot of careers out there, at the end you might have some money in your pocket. > > absolutely i think what's changed is that it's no longer the sort of guaranteed pay off. it used to be that if you put in your, your 100 hour weeks for a number of
connell and the staunch opposition to obamacare. >> you know what in a sane environment people do when they have problems with a good objective? they fix the problems. the other choice is to just pout if you're not -- if your pear is not in the white house and make as many problems as you can, stop anything good from happening and if you cane stop it at least bad mouth it. and then when life being what it is and all of us being imperfect as we are, when there's a problem, do everything you can to make sure the problem is never fixed. it may work and get people torn up and mad all the time. but it's a dumb way to run a country. >> so according to the latest poll in kentucky, it's still anybody's race with grimes leading mcconnell. mcconnell's unpopularity may be leading the polls. mitch mcconnell seems anything but worried about the former president campaigning in his home state. he was asked about it yesterday on capitol hill. >> welcome him back. the last time he ran in 1996 he eked out a narrow victory in kentucky while i beat the current gov any by 160,000 votes, 10 points. in 2008 both bill and hilla
. we can come back tomorrrow. and we promise to keep it that way. driven to preserve the environment, csx moves a ton of freight nearly 450 miles on one gallon of fuel. what a day. can't wait til tomorrow. >>> losing their big man for the next six weeks could prove fatal for the washington wizards. they were 8 & 34 with nane on the court, 1 & 6 this season but with their first playoff appearance in six years in their sights this team found a way to overcome the void at least for tonight. wizards hosting the orlando have another injury scare in the first half. trevor booker who started in his spot, tweeked his ankle and he would return wizards finish the first half strong, john wall making sure that shot fell, wizards up by nine at the break but wall didn't keep all of the points to himself, behind the back pass for a seventh assist of the game, wall 27 points one of four players with at least 20 points tonight, wizards win their fourth in a row 115-106 over orlando. >> i knew i could score a lot more, and i'm trying to do it right way. still trying to get my teammates involved and fi
our environment. i wish e cards were used here. your corner we take a look at trends and above the line china. on tuesday sold to a tiny people have the day of school supply from china the popular thing amongst tiny bit of time and money from women and children are the easiest to get. after studying the market for luxury feel like the woman who apply for the next market being exploited. recently many schools to start their new semester. after the winter vacation. to cap the bottle to watch prepare for the new semester. many stationery stores in shopping malls. the promotions for student poverty and adapted it down. the braves are still freaking out there. they want to look and the defenders of the hundred fifty to three hundred twenty dollars for the children they snared the new semester. the income from one to ten to nine hundred us dollars. the cloth can really add up from ninety one when family. speaking on the common price for school that integrated into the computer. made in china no cooking co production of dollars. cole was attacked the cheapest price to move around too
are the black only one, they live in a very segregated environment. we have to push the people that tell the stor stories to help make america better not are it beingk play what we can do. >> more with russell simmons on "talk to aljazeera" in a minute. >> aging america continues... healtly retirees lending a hand to their aging neighbors. >> it's been tough gettin' old... >> a story of humanity and dignity. >> everybody needs a little bit of help sometimes... >> we can do it! >> on al jajeera america ♪ ♪ >>> you are watching "talk to aljazeera" with russell simmons. there is a couple of people who are quoted talking about your success and they always say, the reason you are successful is you are authentic. you know, did -- >> that's nice. >> what do you think they mean by that, that you are authentic? >> i hope that everybody has -- wants to express themselves in an honest way. i like what i do in every instance i don't do it. >> what does the next 10 years look like? how old are you right now? >> i am 90. >> you are not. >> i am 56. >> you will be on your way to 70 in 10 years. >>
the russian border where they worried their way of life is under threat. >>> plus china's choking environment, smog reaching critical levels. and a change in athletic history. we have more next. we are not meant to be your first choice for entertainment. al jazeera america. we understand that every news story begins and ends with people. >> the efforts are focused on rescuing stranded residents. >> we pursue that story beyond the headline, pass the spokesperson, to the streets. >> thousands of riot police deployed across the capital. >> we put all of our global resources behind every story. >> it is a scene of utter devastation. >> and follow it no matter where it leads - all the way to you. al jazeera america, take a new look at news. >> welcome back to the top stories here on al jazeera. russia has promised to protect its naval fleet in southern ukraine. thprotests have continued into turkey for a second day over a corruption scandal involving the prime minister. turkey's president signed a new law tightening the government's grip on the judiciary which has been investigating claims of corr
are on the environment and are seeking comfort dishes but the police. the arms sales are booming but there are also coming under heightened criticism the industry sold over ten billion dollars worth of weapons in twenty eleven and twenty twelve but is facing awkward questions over and pour into the tiling its use of the palestinian territories as testing grounds. art is falsely year has indeed house. i think there is a very a big elephant in whom it is noted very big fat no reality which is seldom spoken about and that's as far as most people clue when his tools on this industry. the tile has a country the size of the american state of new jersey become the world's six largest exporter people don't really ask what was the what what what the of a small country in the case that it took the power of the of weapons. hilton feldman is a gentleness and to make a decent bbc's award winning documentary an ad in which he argues that israel's occupation of palestine and also to have such a post this weekend's industry. what are you over the world one hour with them which were tested on the ol' us of this the
Search Results 250 to 299 of about 649 (some duplicates have been removed)